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Marks of History: Faith, South Dakota

11/18/2009
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PIERRE, S.D. Founded as the town at the end of the railroad, Faith was originally the hub of a South Dakota homestead boom from 1910-1920.
 
Local residents have been known to say the town got its name from the faith it took to live out on the prairie during harsh winters and hot, dusty and drought-stricken summers.
 
However, the town was named for Faith Rockefeller. She was the daughter of a major railroad investor who founded the prairie town. Faith was the permanent end of the railroad, a local spur off the Milwaukee Road.
 
Although a small community, Faith is well known in the livestock and rodeo industries.
 
Faith is located in northeastern Meade County at the intersection of US Highway 212 and state Highway 73, which is where the town’s historical marker is located.
 
The Marks of History series is a project of the South Dakota Office of Tourism, designed to highlight historical markers all across South Dakota. In the 1950s, the historical markers became a cooperative program between the Historical Society and the Highway Department. Over the years, approximately 700 markers have been created. A majority of the markers are funded privately by individuals or groups throughout the state. The Historical Society, which is part of the South Dakota Department of Tourism and State Development, oversees the program. Click on the special “Marks of History” link at www.MediaSD.com to access the complete list of articles.
 
The Marks of History series is part of Goal 1 of the 2010 Initiative to double visitor spending in South Dakota from 2003-2010 and Goal 4 to enhance history and arts as tools for economic development and cultural tourism in South Dakota. The Office of Tourism serves under the direction of Richard Benda, Secretary of the Department of Tourism and State Development.
 
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Media Notes:
 
  • The South Dakota Office of Tourism is not responsible for the text included on these markers. Some of the language used at the time of production may not be appropriate by today’s standards. Please view the markers at your own discretion.

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