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Marks of History: Struck by the Ree

7/22/2009
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PIERRE, S.D. - In 1804, at the time of Struck by the Ree’s birth, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were having council near his tribe’s encampment along the Missouri River. When hearing of his birth, Lewis and Clark went to the boy, wrapped him in an American flag and proclaimed he would be destined for “Greatness.” 
Struck by the Ree became a resonating symbol of peace, and he spent the rest of his life living up to Lewis and Clark’s prophecy. He became the first Sioux citizen of the United States, was chief of the Yankton Sioux Tribe, traveled to Washington, D.C., in the prospect of peace, and worked tirelessly toward forging and preserving lasting relations with white settlers. In recognition for his peace efforts, three U.S. Presidents awarded him medals, including Ulysses S. Grant, Franklin Pierce, and James Garfield.
Struck by the Ree died in 1888 at the age of 84. A memorial is constructed at his burial site near Greenwood, S.D., to commemorate his achievements and legacy.  A historical marker can be found off of SD Hwy 50, 10 miles south and 4 miles west of Wagner, South Dakota. 
The Marks of History series is a project of the South Dakota Office of Tourism designed to highlight historical markers all across South Dakota. Click on the special “Marks of History” link at www.MediaSD.com to access the complete list of articles.
The Marks of History series is part of Goal 1 of the 2010 Initiative to double visitor spending in South Dakota and Goal 4 to enhance history and arts as a tool for economic development and cultural tourism in South Dakota. The Office of Tourism serves under the direction of Richard Benda, Secretary of the Department of Tourism and State Development.
 
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Media Notes: 
  • Information for this release was obtained from “Brevet’s South Dakota Historical Markers”.
  • The South Dakota Office of Tourism is not responsible for the text included on these markers. Some of the language used at the time of production may not be appropriate by today’s standards. Please view the markers at your own discretion.